Archive for the 'Cybersurveillance' Category

Groundswell against Lawful Access gathering

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011

One of the outcomes of Cyber-Surveillance in Everyday Life was the formation of a group of scholars, civil rights advocates and privacy experts determined to do something about the lawful access legislation contained in the Conservatives’ omnibus crime bill. Our opening public event, entitled (Un)Lawful Access: Cyber-Surveillance, Security & Civil Liberties, featured a panel discussion […]

No surprise: G20 cams *not* down!

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

As of last week, this CCTV camera remained in place at Queen and Peter Streets, despite media reports that the security cameras erected for the G20 summit last June had been taken down. Although Toronto Police announced the 71 CCTV cameras acquired for the G20 would be removed upon “the completion of the event, when […]

Toronto G20 security cams down?

Sunday, September 12th, 2010

As part of its $1.2 billion security budget for the G20, the Toronto Police Service erected 77 closed circuit security cameras in the so-called “security zone” as well as throughout downtown. The mainstream media reports that by the beginning of July, half of these had been taken down, with the other half slated to be […]

Cyber-surveillance in Everyday Life

Friday, August 13th, 2010

As part of my postdoc at U of T’s Faculty of Information, I’m helping organize an international workshop entitled Cyber-surveillance in Everyday Life. It’s part of a series of workshops organized by the New Transparency: Surveillance and Social Sorting. I attended the Surveillance Games, held in Vancouver last year, and Camera Surveillance in Canada, hosted […]

All up in G20′s grill…

Monday, June 21st, 2010

It has been a ridiculously busy last bit, but I thought I’d try to get a few things down. My research on social justice activists’ experience of and response to cybersurveillance in the lead up to the G20 is proceeding apace – I’m slowly gathering the stories of folks who’ve been followed and intimidated by […]

Privacy Commissioner on the trail of online trackers

Thursday, April 29th, 2010

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Warrantless access for Canada?

Sunday, February 28th, 2010

I went to a panel entitled Overdue Update or Big Brother? Lawful Access and Cyber Surveillance at U of T’s Faculty of Law yesterday. It was moderated by Graeme Norton, director of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association’s Public Safety Project. The panel included David Murakami-Wood, a member of the New Transparency project (and the only […]